Legal Affairs
space


Current Issue

 
 
 
 


space space space
September | October 2002
Corporate Affairs: Lincoln Caplan

SCENES
A PENNY SAVED
By John Swansburg
Disney teaches kids a lesson.

EFFECTIVE COMMAND
By Susan Benesch
Salvadoran generals on trial. In Florida.

THE DISOBEDIENT DOZEN
By Josh Saunders
Juries that think for themselves.

AFTER THE RAINBOW
By Megan Twohey
Peace, love, and a mess on federal land.

SATIRE
MCGRUFF, THE CRIME-FIGHTING DOG
How not to take a bite out of crime.

ARGUMENT
GO DUTCH
By Tom Geoghegan
The untapped promise of the International Criminal Court: It's the perfect forum for trying terrorists.

THE O.J. EFFECT
By Wendy Davis
Since the Simpson trial, juries have been reluctant to acquit celebrities. Michael Skakel found out the hard way that the burden of proof has shifted.



FEATURES
RWANDAN GHOSTS
By Victor Peskin
After the genocide, an international tribunal is failing to sort the criminals from the victims. ALSO: Ruti Teitel on National Sovereignty

RADIO HATE
By Dina Temple-Raston
Rwandan media executives are on trial for inciting genocide. Their case will pressure international courts to crack down on free speech.

KISS & TELL
By Amy Benfer
Prosecutors in California are asking the professionals who treat teenage girls to disregard the confidentiality of patients and help go after statutory rapists.



REVIEWS

PRACTICE
THE HOURS
By Niki Kuckes
The short, unhappy history of how lawyers bill their clients.

ACADEMY
THE BLOOD-MONEY MYTH
By Tom Baker
Personal-injury plaintiffs and their lawyers will stop at nothing in their callous pursuit of money. Or so the stereotype goes.

RULE OF LAW
MONSOON IN A TEACUP
By Ratna Kapur
In India, arranged marriages are uncontroversial. In Britain, they're causing a stir.

SATIRE
THE CASE OF THE SWITCHED SUIT
By Lloyd Dangle

REFORM
SMOG & MIRRORS
By Alec Appelbaum
Corporate lawyers suddenly have a crucial role to play in the effort to thwart climate change.

PRACTICE
PROSAIC JUSTICE
By Anthony Sebok
In America, legal advocates for slavery reparations are relying on the cold logic of property law, not the moral force of human rights.



STORIES

GENRE
ART ON TRIAL: AN ODD BIRD
Stéphanie Giry on the 1927 trial that redefined the meaning of art.

DISPATCH
BUSTING CHOPS
Katherine Marsh on who gets to decide what's kosher.

EXCAVATION
THE DEMON OF ANDERSONVILLE
Carolyn Kleiner on the Confederate soldier who ran the Civil War's deadliest prison.



EXHIBIT
WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION

Back to Top
space space space










space
Contact Us