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MARCH | APRIL 2006
Money! Power! Ambition Gone Awry!
A frank history of the big-time American lawyer.
By Robert W. Gordon

One Stop Law Shop
The land of solicitors and barristers teaches America how a freer market could deliver better legal services.
By Richard A. Epstein

Vartkes's List
By Michael Bobelian


January | February 2006
Without A Net
The Internet is vulnerable to viruses so lethal that they could gravely damage the online world—unless we upgrade law and technology now.
By Jonathan Zittrain

Lawyers in Their Habitats
Law firms contemplating transnational mergers should start thinking like anthropologists.
By Bryant Garth

Quarterback Sneak
With its college football video game, EA Sports is making an end run around the NCAA's rules.
By Andy Latack


November | December 2005
Behind the Hedge
By David Skeel
In the untamed world of hedge funds, rigged deals and manipulated markets help the wealthy thrive while ordinary investors wither.

The Enemy Among Us
By Geoffrey Gagnon
They have grown smaller and quieter over the past decade, but citizen militias are still locked and loaded in rural America.

Is the FBI paying attention?

Fundamental Imports
By Mark Tushnet
The European origins of American civil liberties (and the American Civil Liberties Union).


September | October 2005
Furious George
By Neil Kinkopf
The belligerence of the Bush Administration in pursuing expansive power has a long Republican pedigree.

Lessons From the Swiss Cheese Map
By Shari Motro
Why have Israeli-Palestinian peace talks ignored the importance of good mapmaking?

Point-Blank Verse
By David Skeel
A school of poetry says the words of judges provide a more vivid record of what we see and feel than the stanzas of Shelley or Wordsworth.

Evil Twins
By John Wolfson
And how DNA evidence is useless against them.


July | August 2005
What Would Allah Do?
By Nadya Labi
In its fight against terrorism, Yemen finds that the words of a heavenly power deliver down-to-earth results.

The Dread Pirate Bin Laden
By Douglas R. Burgess Jr.
Thinking of terrorists as pirates can help win the war on terror.

Land of the Rising Lawyer?
By Annie Murphy Paul
A bold solution to Japan's floundering economy: 68 American-style law schools.

City of Blight
By Geoffrey Gagnon
Detroit's new weapon in its war on eyesores.


May | June 2005
The Brains Behind Blackmun
By David J. Garrow
Harry Blackmun's papers reveal that, more than any justice in memory, he gave his law clerks control over his thinking and writing when he was on the Supreme Court.

Unbecoming Justice Blackmun
By William Saletan
Linda Greenhouse's book reveals a justice who cared more about politics than about women's rights.

The Prince of Darknet
By Joseph D. Lasica
Why is a trafficker in pirated movies sailing to Hollywood's rescue?

Blawgs
By Lincoln Caplan
The Supreme Court recently made history by citing a blog.


March | April 2005
Insult to Injury
By Reynolds Holding
Servicemen and women disabled in the line of duty trust the government will provide for them. But many return home to find themselves facing a new enemy: the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Hail to the Chief?
Has William Rehnquist humbly served the law or arrogantly grabbed power for the court? Two former Supreme Court clerks take sides on the legacy of the chief justice.
Richard W. Garnett: Right on.
Kermit Roosevelt: Wrong, but not too Right.

How the West was Lost
By Daniel Brook
How were the people of Portland, Oregon, once the country's fiercest anti-sprawl crusaders, convinced to give up the fight?

Pop Con
By David A. Strauss
One of the hot ideas in the legal academy is that the people should have supremacy over the courts. The problem is that the people don't want that.


January | February 2005
The Gentle People
By Nadya Labi
Impressed by their piety, courts have permitted the Amish to live outside the law. But in some places, the group's ethic of forgive and forget has produced a plague of incest—and let many perpetrators go unpunished.

Common Denominator
By Nicholas Thompson
With sophisticated mathematical models, economists have proven that a country's legal history greatly affects its economy. At least they think they've proven it.

Man and the Machines
By Benjamin Soskis
It's time to start thinking about how we might grant legal rights to computers.

The Appearance of Propriety
By Alex Kozinski
The judicial canons have got it wrong. The real ethical issues facing judges are hidden from view.


November | December 2004

The Epidemic on Aisle 6
By Mark Schone
Busting a record number of methamphetamine labs hasn't rid the Midwest of its latest drug scourge. Now cops want to make it harder to buy cold pills that contain a key meth ingredient. Will the drug lobby let them?

Wyatt Earp Takes the Stand
By John Swansburg
Was the quintessential American lawman guilty of manslaughter for his role in the gunfight at the O.K. Corral?

Onward, Christian Lawyers
By Geoffrey Gagnon
Our reporter gets kicked out of Jerry Falwell's new law school.

Against The Law Reviews
By Richard A. Posner
Welcome to a world where inexperienced editors make articles about the wrong topics worse.


September | October 2004

BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU VOTE FOR
With only one Supreme Court justice under the age of 65, your vote for president in November could be for three, perhaps four, new Supreme Court justices. A forum on Election 2004 with Stephen B. Presser, David Strauss, and Mark Tushnet.

LITIGATION BY LOAN SHARK
By Daniel Brook
Litigation finance companies loan money to plaintiffs who can't afford to go to court. But is this new industry helping victims or exploiting the system?

STEALING THE SHOW
By Emily Bazelon
Has Israel's prosecution of suspected terrorist Marwan Barghouti created the Palestinian Mandela?


July | August 2004

WANT YOUR KID TO DISAPPEAR?
By Nadya Labi
For $1,800, former Atlanta police officer Rick Strawn will make that problem child someone else's problem.

SPOT ON?
By Adam Hanft
Lawyers are spending more money than ever to advertise on TV. Are they getting their money's worth?

CRASH COURSE
By Jascha Hoffman
Can the science of reconstructing car accidents show whether the driver and passenger were really having sex?


May | June 2004

THE WOMAN BEHIND GAY MARRIAGE
By Emily Bazelon
Has Margaret Marshall, the chief justice who ordered Massachusetts to allow same-sex marriage, jeopardized her court for a cause?

MEDEA'S SHADOW
By Charlotte Faltermayer
New evidence suggests that the medical diagnosis used to convict Marybeth Davis of infanticide may be a medical fiction.

THE SWORD OF SPITZER
By Nicholas Thompson
A little-known law called the Martin Act gives New York's attorney general extraordinary power, and Eliot Spitzer is wielding it against the biggest players on Wall Street.

SEPARATING CHURCH AND REAL ESTATE
By Elizabeth Austin
As conservative parishes leave the liberal Episcopal Church, who shall inherit the real estate?
March | April 2004

THE PROBLEM OF PRISON RAPE
By Daniel Brook
More rapes occur in prison each year than in New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago combined. Are we ignoring the problem—or do we just not care?

THE CASE FOR ARNOLD 2008
By Akhil Reed Amar
Why the Constitution won't let immigrants run for president—and why that should change.

HOW I LOST THE BIG ONE
By Lawrence Lessig
When the fight for the public domain reached the Supreme Court, it needed help from a lawyer, not a scholar.

Call Forwarding
By Nicholas Thompson
A new technology allows consumers to make cheap, clear phone calls over the Internet. Will the law allow it to flourish?
January | February 2004

THE BIG KOZINSKI
By Emily Bazelon
If the Ninth Circuit were a circus—and some say it is—Alex Kozinski would be its ringmaster. Presenting the most controversial judge on our most controversial court.

RIGHTING THE SHIP OF DEMOCRACY
By Bruce Ackerman and James Fishkin
A radical proposal to help voters make better decisions.

MRS. AMERICA
By Nadya Labi
The business of mail-order marriage.

PUTTING A PRICE TAG ON HAPPINESS
By Brendan I. Koerner
How an influential economist determined that your happiness is worth $3.2 million.
November | December 2003

Unbecoming Conduct
By Steve Weinberg
A prosecutor in Nashville is accused of manipulating evidence to send a defendant to death row.

Ramsey Clark's Prosecution Complex
By Josh Saunders
How did Lyndon Johnson's attorney general come to defend dictators, war criminals, and terrorists?

Falling on Deaf Ears
By Lawrence M. Solan and Peter M. Tiersma
Scientists say that earwitnesses are unreliable. Why aren't the courts listening?

Judge Joe
By Ted Morgan
How the youngest judge in Wisconsin's history became the country's most notorious senator.
September | October 2003

The Practitioner
By Benjamin Smith
Linda Fairstein changed the way rape is prosecuted. But will she be remembered for her pragmatism or her bad publicity?

In Defense Of Prostitution
By Heidi Fleiss as told to Nadya Labi
Why the world's oldest profession should be legal.

The Real Harm
By Gabrielle S. Friedman
Sexual harassment law should fight discrimination, not regulate desire.

A Viable Solution
By Jeffrey Rosen
Why it makes sense to permit abortions and punish those who kill fetuses.
July | August 2003

TO KILL AN AVATAR
By Dan Hunter and F. Gregory Lastowka
Norrath, the online world created by Sony, has more residents than Miami and a bigger GNP than Bulgaria. Who will make its laws?

YOUR CELLPHONE IS A HOMING DEVICE
By Brendan I. Koerner
Don't want the government to know where you are? Throw away your cell, stop taking the subway, and pay the toll in cash.

THE COPYRIGHT CAGE
By Jonathan Zittrain
Teddy bears can't include tape decks. Girl Scouts who sing "Puff, the Magic Dragon" owe royalties. Copyright law needs to change.

Seeing it Both Ways
By Orin S. Kerr
Matthew Kammersell was convicted for making a threat because he didn't know the difference between the physical and virtual realities of the Internet. Do the courts?

May | June 2003

WHEN GOD GOES TO PRISON
By Daniel Brook
The Carol Vance Unit is the kind of faith-based program the Bush Administration would like to see more of. Its mix of religion and rehabilitation may violate the First Amendment, but may also make it the best prison in Texas.

The New Brown
By Richard D. Kahlenberg
Integration by class, not race, can fix schools in poor cities.

Casualties of Medicine
By Stephanie Mencimer
Why the debate over medical malpractice lawsuits misses the point—patient safety.

Bad Neighbors
By Emily Bazelon
The community that refused to live next door to Shell Oil.

March | April 2003

THE STRONG ARM OF THE LAW
By Cass R. Sunstein
The Rehnquist Court is pushing its agenda on the rest of the country. PLUS an opposing point of view by Orin Kerr.

Opinion For Sale
By Steven Moss
Confessions of an expert witness.

Jailing Teens
By Nell Bernstein
The devastating effects of locking up homeless teenagers and youths who commit crimes in California.

Danger in Numbers
By Neal Kumar Katyal
Why it makes sense to have harsh punishments for conspiracy.

January | February 2003

After the Revolution
By Emily Bazelon
Albie Sachs lost an arm in the fight against apartheid. Now that he's a justice on South Africa's high court, he's more cautious than rebellious.

Liberté, Egalité, Sororité
By Garance Franke-Ruta
Despite a law designed to elect more women to the French government, male incumbents remain entrenched. What went wrong?

November | December 2002

huMOUSE: CAN YOU PATENT A MONSTER?
By Dashka Slater
A design for creatures that are half man, half animal has raised fundamental questions about what it means to be human. Biotechnology critics want the U.S. government to answer them.



September | October 2002

WHAT'S WRONG NOW IN RWANDA?
By Victor Peskin
After the genocide, an international tribunal is failing to sort the criminals from the victims.

KISS & TELL
By Amy Benfer
Prosecutors in California are asking professionals to disregard the confidentiality of their teenage patients and help go after statutory rapists.

July | August 2002

BUMBLE IN THE BRONX
By David Feige
Banned from the courtroom and hounded by a difficult judge, I couldn't keep an honest client out of jail. The tale of a New York City public defender.

IN SEARCH OF LOST CRIME
By Caleb Crain
Bloated bodies, bigamous love, and other literary pleasures of the 19th-century trial transcript.

May | June 2002

LET THERE BE LAW
By Emily Bazelon
Israel doesn’t have a written constitution. Aharon Barak has transformed the country’s supreme court by acting as if it did. And his court has emerged mighty but wounded. Also: Aharon Barak on Judging as a Way of Life

CYBERCRIME: FROM RUSSIA WITH LØPHT
By Brendan I. Koerner
The Russian hacker Alexey Ivanov flew to Seattle for a job interview with a tech company. It turned out to be the FBI.

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